Autism Watch: 2007

Posts Tagged ‘coffee

When I’m not being a mom to my kids, one of them of course being BB (the cutest little boy in the world who just happens to have autism), working or doing some other mother/wife/house-related chore, I am in my kitchen. (Okay, I do make jewelry and scrapbook, but not nearly as often as I’d like.) I love to bake and cook, and I’m taking photography classes on the side so a favorite website of mine is The Pioneer Woman. She not only shares the best recipes on her Tasty Kitchen page, but she is just an entertaining read, and I always come away from her site feeling like I’ve been given a window onto a life I’ll never experience and probably would fall in love. Well, most of it, some of the ranching stuff is over my head.

Anyway, she’s got this fantastic giveaway going on (again) and you can read about it here: http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/special-offers/2010/11/name-your-favorite-holiday-recipes-and-enter-to-win-a-printer/ Or, because I’m nice this way, click here: The Pioneer Woman/HP Printer Giveaway.

My favorite recipe of hers — right now, at least, as there are so many, new and old, that I change frequently as I try new things — is the Dulce de Leche coffee. I was making the dulce de leche homemade until I found it in Walmart of all places the other day. I think I did a little skip, I’d been looking forever, and I couldn’t even find it in California before I moved here to the good ole south, where awesome food ingredients and fancy equipment is harder to find. That was yesterday, and while I had no time to make any last night, it is on the menu for this evening.

Try it out yourself, you will LOVE it. Dulce de Leche Coffee. You can thank me later. Even us autism moms, or maybe especially us autism moms, need to take a little break for ourselves and enjoy a treat, which this most definitely is. (My abs couldn’t take it if I did it too often!)

 

Advertisements

I was recently lent this book by someone in the education field, someone who I was really pleased to meet and am very thankful for, and I’ve only known her a couple of days. She lent me this book within minutes of meeting me, a Southern sense of generosity I am quickly growing to love and appreciate, and hoping to emulate.  Not only am I excited because I haven’t had a good book to read in months (due to the move) but I love Jodi Picoult books, and this book is right down my alley of interest because its focus is on a family dealing with Aspergers, a mild form of autism. (Though I hate to use the word “mild,” because even the mildest of autism labels on a bad day can be devastating.)

Since the move, my back has been acting up — I guess herniated and bulging discs tend to not improve when you sit in a car driving for ten hours a day — and I’ve had to take pain meds for my migraines twice. Not a great track record for being here less than two weeks, and I hate to look like a wimp to people who haven’t been around me 24/7 for long. I’m also plain out tired much more frequently than normal. (I had high hopes of staying up till 10pm at least, get things done, just hang out with my husband, blog, you know, all that romantic stuff. Ha.) A book is the perfect thing to add in when I’m not as agile as I’d like to be and I’m tired, though I hate to be tired. It wastes my time. Then again, maybe it’s a sign to chill out, slow down, and enjoy what’s happening right now, this process of starting over, to remember it, to live it, and to enjoy it. To be philosophical when I’m normally not, by remembering life isn’t just about achieving your goals, but the steps you take to get there.

While I’m only about ten pages into the book, I am sucked in. Jodi does an amazing job of portraying real-life Aspergers/autism — she gets it. She thanks a large group of people for helping her, and I thank them for sharing their very personal details, but I also thank Jodi moreso for wording it in a way that’s believable and will help the general public understand what we go through. The meltdowns in public for tiny things. The stares that burn you despite years of practice ignoring them. The need for routine and the critical effort we parents put forward to focus on the big issues and let the little ones slide as necessary. Within the first two pages of text, I found so many of the little things that we deal with daily, put in print where I could read to my husband and say “WOW. Someone GETS it. Now others will GET it.”

I have to admit to some guilt when I read a chapter from the brother’s perspective. I’ve always felt my other children get short shrift at times, but what do you do? You have only two arms and can only be in one place at a time. When one child’s huddled on the floor shrieking, you can’t lift him up and throw him into a car, buckle him in, and safely drive to a DMV driver’s license appointment. You want to listen to your other child and give them the time they need and deserve, but you’re mentally drained from forcing your ASD child to go to school. You feel guilty that you can’t do it all, but you feel guilty for thinking anything that even slightly, and only to yourself, implies that you would begrudge your ASD child every ounce of energy needed to improve or even just get by. Guilt, it’s all around if you let it in.

I hope to read some from Jacob’s perspective soon. The autistic mind fascinates me, and any little bit of understanding I can gain will only benefit us, even if I don’t like what I hear. I am thankful I am not going this alone, as the mom in “House Rules” is, but I am impressed with her outlook and her realistic struggle to do it all, and do it all right, while accepting that she can’t.

I hope to dive in and read another 100 pages or so this evening, though I don’t want to be rude and hide in the bedroom again, as I’ve had to do a few times for either a backache or a headache. Me, the runner, avid exercise enthusiast, wannabe personal trainer and health nut, dealing with health issues when I least have the time for them. There’s work, my son, my other kids, my husband, the animals, and so many other things I want to do — we gardened (planted potatoes, a variety of peppers, beans, etc.), we swung at some golf balls, we talk, and we just plain out live. In California, we ran from one thing to another, only really kicking back to watched Tivo’d shows together, a Nascar race, or visit friends. Then there were the innumerable errands to Target, Kohl’s, Gamestop, and of course, Starbucks. Relaxing and ‘living’ occurred between all the ‘have to’ events. Strangely enough, I don’t miss any of that. I have replaced the extra expenditures with a cup of coffee enjoyed while watching BB chase his dog around the backyard. I have replaced the need for more clothes by wearing the same tank top twice in 10 days — gasp! It’s possible! Only the family sees me anyway, and there’s a strange joy in saving money. Who knew. (And having an unemployed husband will also make that easier…though that’s not for long. He’s having a really hard time not working, he’s the kind who can’t sit still and must be productive and active all day, every day, but he’s enjoying handling school issues and dropoffs/pickups. He found he enjoys mowing and tilling a garden, and bringing me another cup of coffee. And I’m enjoying having him around more.)

To the family of Nadia, the little girl with autism who was recently found after being missing for 4-5 days, God bless you. We breathed a sigh of relief when we heard you were safe and surrounded by those who love you. May your family and you get the privacy you need to recoup. Another miracle occurred, and she’s home.

I whined yesterday about all the things going on, but once just isn’t enough. Be warned.

Awards event at school yesterday, and ds was unnecessarily upset (not his own fault, imo) by a technicality. Sometimes I really wish people would understand how important these things are to ASD kids. Little upsets that just aren’t worth the fight can ruin an entire afternoon. And this did. I’ll leave it at that, but I just want to be like other parents, go and watch something and have a smiley child who is enjoying himself. Heck, I’ll forego the smile, I just want him to enjoy himself.

With no respite last night, I had to tote him along with me to Borders. He didn’t want to go, but the bribe of a chocolate chip cookie was too strong to ignore. But..and this shouldn’t surprise me, given how our week is gone..Seattle’s Best was out of chocolate chip. They had some delicious looking other flavors, but no chip. Oh no, he’s getting anxious. Oh look, a bakery next door. Run across the street, find the cookie. Crisis averted. We find Jenny’s latest book on the “new” shelf, pay the cashier (feeling the ridiculously increased tax hike for the first time and nearly cry…if I feel it on a book, what about when I shop for clothes for the kids or order his new supplements??) and enjoy my non-fat Blackberry Cream Latte. The little things in life. I was trying to keep ds calm about his cookie, then realized: would I be upset if I couldn’t get a coffee right then? Probably.

I am exhausted. I am so thankful it’s Friday. I’m not sure if the weekend will be a relaxing one, it’s too early to tell — as in, I don’t know until five minutes beforehand, and sometimes not even then — but at least I won’t be throwing work into the mix. I’ve been working earlier most days anymore, so I can be sure to put in my time around any issues with ds. It’s do-able, but when you dream of being chased by scary dogs, when ds isn’t coming into your room due to another nightmare, sleep is fragmented.

Today we’re going back to Kirkman’s chewable multi-vite. Ds isn’t currently GFCF so it’s fine. We saw the biggest improvement on it, but he hates the taste. I am not a walking checkbook, so I’d like to get him to use this bottle before I switch to a liquid or other version of it. I’m also starting him on double S. boulardii, a good probiotic to combat the yeast that’s probably built back up in his system. We did an anti-yeast protocol around 18-20 months ago and it was fantastic but it can return so it’s a good time to try again.

And, because it’s fun, ds is home from school again. Okay, it’s not really fun but you gotta laugh to get through the neverending stuff or you’ll go crazy. He woke up at 5:40am and said his leg is burning. No swelling, joint is fine, but it hurts to touch. What now? He’s near tears, and when he’s not looking, we tested it by touching the leg. OUCH!! So, a new symptom added to the mix. We’ve decided that it’s time to go back to no dietary infractions: all homecooked/homebaked stuff and no dyes. (Dad bought him Fruit Gushers earlier this week, which to me is just a big package of HFCS and dye, but Dad was giving in to a sweet boy who’d already had a lot of stuff going on and really wanted to try the gushers. Who knew.) He also had a couple of processed foods, like pizza pockets. Yanking those out of the diet too. He was already acting odd/off by then, with the lip licker’s dermatitis and headaches, so at least we can’t blame those on bad food, we really are careful with his diet. But this leg thing has thrown me for a loop.

It’s a rainy day here, so I’ll be getting the fireplace going shortly and will make it a snuggle & cuddle day. We got AT&T U-verse installed, so he can watch anything he records on any tv, and he’s got his own tv in his room. Well-worth the cost. (And the money we’re saving over our prior services is a good thing, too. TV, phone and high-speed internet together is way cheaper.)

Enjoy the weekend. Not sure if I’ll be blogging or not. I do have to say I’m disappointed I saw so little about World Autism Awareness Day, other than some online mentions in the appropriate autism-related places/communities. Nothing on TV or on the news. I guess it’s less important than what the latest loser celebrity is doing or other ridiculous news stories I did see on. Shows you where our priorities lie.


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 34 other followers

Twitter Updates

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.


Advertisements