Autism Watch: 2007

Posts Tagged ‘abc

I was surprised. There you have it. The premiere of “Eli Stone” almost two weeks ago surprised me. I didn’t expect it to be good. I didn’t expect it to turn out the way it did. I moreso didn’t expect to have yet another show on Season Pass for my DVR to record weekly. (Who has time?)

So, way to go, ABC, for not bowing down to the AAP, CDC and whomever else asked you to cancel the show. Thank you for realizing that viewers have their own brains, can think for themselves, and can tell fiction from non enough to not be influenced so easily. However, <insert sarcasm here> way to go, ABC, for directing people with questions about autism to the CDC. CDC?? (I should use big font there. BIG.) As in “what were you thinking?” Center for Disease Control? So autism is a disease? If yes, why hasn’t the CDC found the cure for this disease? Oh, that’s right. Head in the sand. What was I thinking?

Disorder. Syndrome. Fine. But disease? No. So the CDC isn’t the place to refer people for information on autism. So many better places to mention. So many.

Almost two weeks ago, as I shared here already, we started our son on Risperdal. We are 11 days into it (12?) and I wish I could say I’ve seen a difference. His highs are still high, his lows are abysmal, and he’s still got a mean left uppercut…and right jab. Ask his siblings. Ask me. And his mouth? Ask anyone, I’m sure the neighbors all hear it. This morning, he cycled into this horrible sobbing period of depression that it took a while to get him out of. I succeeded, but I’m just waiting for the other shoe to fall. Or to be thrown, more accurately. With a low comes a high, and vice versa. Highs sometimes mean manic running from one end of the house to another, non-stop talking, screaming, laughing hysterically, standing and listing all the reasons he loves me…but lows mean he wants to tell me the depth of his anger, how much he hates us, how he hates himself, and how stupid he is. There are days I just hug him, because I know he doesn’t want to be this way, and other times I want to but can’t because he’s so mad that I can’t get near him. Six months ago, I’d not have been able to understand how draining this type of cycling is. I figured I’d seen the worst of his autism, that he was only going to get better with more treatment. Now all I know is that I don’t know enough, and each day brings something different.

Another update: ds’s ankles are still wobbly, and if we can get him to wear them, we have an orthotics prescription. They won’t ‘fix’ his ankles, per se, but they may make his legs hurt less when he walks a lot. Now we just have to see if we can get him to wear them. I’m not even sure insurance will pick up the cost, and last I knew, they were pushing $300. $300 for something for him to throw at someone at school? I don’t know.

On a similar note, has anyone encountered questions from the school in regards to your child’s behavior that they feel are caused by meds? If yes, I’d love to hear from you. (Hasn’t happened to me yet, but I do have a reason for asking, I promise.)

Back to work. Not much time to be on the computer outside of work hours the last couple of weeks, ds’s meltdowns have been severe and exhausting. Right now, it’s one day at a time. We go someplace if he’s doing good, and we stay home if he’s not. We split up our errands when possible so one of us is home with him, rather than taking him with us. Everything takes such planning, and while we qualify for respite, finding an agency who has an LVN available for part-time hours has been impossible. Tack on my 13 yod, who has seizure disorder and just had another 10 days ago, and every day is something different. I used to laugh at the “God never gives us more than we can handle” phrase because I don’t believe it was intended to be interpreted as it often is. In reality, God doesn’t give us more than we can handle, because we find a way to handle whatever it is. (I mean, really, what’s the option?) He will just always be there with us, throughout all of that, and with God, we can handle all things. Those without faith, I don’t know, it’s what gets me through because I know there’s a reason for all this. I know there’s a reason that we have two kids with extraordinary needs. What it is, I may never know, but I’m hanging onto the “faith faith a faith-a”…and was glad to see that reflected in “Eli Stone,” even if it came via “Everyone want a Dr. Chen” character, who just had a way of breaking it down so right.

So, way to go ABC, I’ll be watching Eli again this week … though I hope that Eli’s future visions have singers other than George Michael. 😉 


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