Autism Watch: 2007

The Autism Revolution: a must-read!

Posted on: May 3, 2012

I live in a small town. A four -stoplight kind of town. (Wow, I never saw that coming given that I’m from the busy ‘burbs of California.) Our library means well, the staff is nice and they have some great offerings, but as far as books, it doesn’t house the new stuff. (Unless it’s a book on the south or a fictional southern-based drama, but I digress…) To get something new, I have to utilize their intra-library loan system and sometimes get on a wait list.

Last week, I was uber-surprised that a) the county library system had the new book I was looking for, and b) that there was no wait list.

I didn’t expect for a new book on autism to make it onto their shelves, in an area where the word often gets you the “hmmm, I think you just need to spank him” response. I should not have been surprised at all though that there was no wait list. That was the California part of my brain, where I am used to there being a lot of people who research autism, acknowledge autism, and read the latest and greatest books on it. Sigh, I’m digressing again.

Here’s the book I’m talking about: The Autism Revolution   Check it out.

One week later, I’m two-thirds done and I have learned SO much, but more importantly, I’m stuck on “Someone gets it!!! Finally!”

Dr. Martha Herbert gets it. She not only gets it, but she puts it out there in an awesome book so the rest of us can get it, too. I want to hug her. (If I ever am lucky enough to go to a conference, I want to at least tell you the major thanks I am feeling. I did meet her about five-six years ago, but I highly doubt she’d remember me.)

I want to give this book to every doctor and teacher I know. (The cynical part of me thinks most teachers wouldn’t read it. After the years of hassles and hardships at schools, I don’t know if BB will ever go back to a public school. In an ideal situation, he’ll be attending a magnet school for computer skills, a perfect world for both of us.)  This book breaks down, in no uncertain terms, how autism is a whole-body issue. The brain and body work together. If one is affected, the other will be affected. Someone gets it! Finally!!

It also highlights what so many of us parents have seen but not so many doctors acknowledge: autism, in a high percentage of kids, includes a list of medical issues that are frequently treated as ‘just a coincidence,’ unrelated to autism, yet so many of our kids experience. When BB was young, he was a medical puzzle. Chronic diarrhea. Years later, encopresis and constipation. Skin rashes. Frequent ear infections. Swollen lymph nodes. Reflux. Food intolerances. The list goes on. The first 15 pages alone of this book sucked me in, and I had my husband sitting down to read it. (And this is a guy who doesn’t want to sit and read books — he’ll be the first to tell you, read this book.)

I’m not done yet, but I’ve already made a trek to the health food sites and ordered B-6, magnesium and more probiotics. DHA (fish oil) is next, but I’m a big believer of one new thing at a time, so if there’s any difference — positive or negative — you know what to attribute it to. Someone gets it! Finally!!

Get a hold of this book and take notes. It’s well-worth your time to read a book that will prove invaluable.

 

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3 Responses to "The Autism Revolution: a must-read!"

Thanks for your great review of The Autism Revolution! Would you be interested in hosting a book giveaway? We could provide you with a couple of books. Please let me know if you’re interested: natalie_ramm@hms.harvard.edu

Thank you so much for your informative and enthusiastic comments! Definitely a hug is in order if we’re in the same place at the same time! Meanwhile an e-hug (or i-hug!) to you!!
The idea seems to be arising spontaneously in various places of having a campaign for families to give the book to their doctors or teachers. Perhaps this might become more organized. It would be so great for parents to feel that their clinicians and care-givers could see the big picture and support a comprehensive approach to making life all it can be.
Thank you again!!

You are so welcome! This book has been such a source of encouragement for us when we’re facing some new challenges as our little guy nears puberty. (A prospect, by the way, which really excites him. Us? Not so much?) I’ve read a lot of books about autism and this one pulls it altogether in a way no other has, so thank you again! I hope to have the chance to attend a conference or event again where you’re speaking.
If there is/was a way to organize a way to get your book into the hands of doctors and teachers everywhere, I’d take it on! I fully intend on giving a copy to my son’s pediatrician and if he returns to public school, one for his teacher(s). (If I could quiz them after to see if they really read it, even better.) The more people that read it, the better our kids and autism community will be!
Thank you for posting!!

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