Autism Watch: 2007

Back to blogging about autism? I hope so?

Posted on: May 2, 2012

I left for a while. Okay, a long while. Things were busy. Things were *mostly* good. We began homeschooling and BB is thriving. We took a trip. Dogs are doing well.

Truth is, I ran out of things to say. Re-hashing my day with BB was losing its appeal. As he does better, which is what we hoped and prayed for, there were less autism-related issues to share. I also got tired of using my blog as a place to re-live irritations by sharing in the hopes that a) others could relate and maybe shed some insight on what to do, and b) maybe the irritations would stop happening.

Ha.

So I’m back. BB is still much better, and each day, we see more and more of him coming out. He amazes me with his humor and just yesterday, a computer animation he put on YouTube surpassed 9,000,000 views. For reals. He’s got a bright future ahead.

I’m still going to share the good and the bad..and unfortunately, in addition to the good, I have some bad.

Some days, when I’m out and about, I run into people who impress me and inspire me. I see kindness in strange places. But sometimes, I see ugliness. I see close-mindedness and “This is my way, so it’s the right way. The end.” I try to remember that not everyone is this way, but when you’re already tired, stressed, or just plain burned out, it’s easy to let the bad outweigh the good, even temporarily.

Last week, I took my son to a long-awaited night at a museum event. We spent the night, along with a slew of other kids that he didn’t know, except one. He was oh.so.excited. They had a presentation and he asked a lot of questions. He likes to clarify rules — maybe it’s irritating to some, but I don’t know, I’d rather he get the clarification he needs rather than just wonder and break a rule, which would have far worse consequences. He also likes to punctuate rules with “Wow. Okay.” or “What?” It’s not disruptive, it’s not over the top, it’s just a far cry from the kid who wouldn’t go to a public event or speak up if he did. I’ll take this BB over the BB of several years ago. If I’d been next to him, I’d have nudged him, but to make a scene by ‘excuse me..excuse me..excuse me..’ to walk up the only aisle, in the middle of the seats, to get to him and tell him to hush? Humiliation and more disruption. I was in the back, where parents usually sit, again, trying to do the right thing.

In comes one of those women, you know, the kind who has perfect children that would never speak out. The prodigies. The kids who can break rules in other ways, and we’re supposed to overlook them.  The kind of woman who sits with all the kids rather than with the adults, oblivious to the fact she’s blocking the view of kids sitting behind her, the kind who thinks the event is solely for her kids and the other kids are just in the way. Come on, we’ve all seen them. Maybe some of us don’t care about their existence, and maybe some agree with that kind of behavior, but I don’t. My child is just that: my child. If I’m there, I will guide. I will discipline. I will nudge. I am in charge, other than the teacher. If you don’t care about their existence, maybe it’s because they’ve never poked your child on the shoulder to say “Stop interrupting!” or because you are easily irritated when others’ kids do something you find misbehaving so you speak up. (If you’re one who speaks up to strangers’ children, here’s a thought: mind your beeswax. If it’s not your house or you’re not the teacher, restrain yourself. If you can’t control your behavior and reactions, don’t expect your children, or others’ kids, to control theirs either.)

This put a big damper on the event. It took me two hours to calm him down. He was angry. He doesn’t like to be touched by strangers, and in my opinion, he has a right to feeling that way. Yes, ideally, he’d be able to better handle it but right now, I have bigger fish to fry. The fact that I got him to an overnight event is a big deal! I can’t downplay that, or let anything else do it either. And I was angry. All the work I’d done was about to get flushed away, all because someone else was irritated by something small and not necessarily even legit. She got to go hang out with her friends and smiling kids, and I was left with an angry child unable to enjoy the cool stuff all around him, a kid who spent the rest of the night trying to block out the sounds because the overstimulation (both physically and emotionally) had him super-sensitive to sound.

No, I didn’t approach her. Should I have? Yes..but to do so would have meant I would have had to dredge it back up in front of him, and that wouldn’t have done any good. Instead, I suggested that we have some type of awareness program as a co-op offering, and that was shot down because, well, it’s acceptable to tell others’ kids to shut up, and if I want people to not do it, or not touch him, he should wear a shirt announcing it. (Okay, so I’m exaggerating a little bit with the shirt bit but the gist is the same.) The response was that I should pre-emptively tell everyone, talk to the leader, and somehow foresee anything that *might* happen and cover it with a list of Do’s and Don’ts.  I’m still amazed that I should know that someone might butt in my business and touch him and/or tell him to be quiet. I mean, really? Maybe I’m naive and people do that all the time…but keep in mind, my son was a stranger to this woman. He was familiar with this outing as we’d gone to many daytime classes there, and he felt comfortable. There goes that! Now I am supposed to sit with him..and by the way, let’s not forget that the teacher isn’t in charge, any parent around has the right to step in, duh! What was I thinking?

/rant off

We experienced a problem, fixed it on our end and tried to advocate so that we didn’t experience it again in the future nor did anyone else. But advocacy is often unwelcome. People don’t necessarily want to hear it. They want us to not bother their perfect worlds or to come out in public where we can teach our kids what they need to do. People don’t want to be inconvenienced. Opening your mind or being willing to show tolerance — which is pushed all over the place in this political campaign, to everyone except the disabled — is not something everyone’s going to do, regardless of how hard we tried.

I will admit, I cried last night. Frustration that I tried and was rebuffed so ‘sorry, too bad.’ Sad that these people walk around, head held high, completely ignorant of the people around them. Upset that instead of making the situation better, who knows if people will single him out now in the future. And if I find a parent went to the venue management? Possible legal involvement. I don’t mess around. Invisible disabilities are discriminated against on a daily basis, and I’m at a loss as to how to change that. Oh, wait, I was told to start a support group. Uhm, yeah, great, where a bunch of us can sit around and talk about how we’ve all been rebuffed? We can come up with all these perfect plans we want, but in reality, they each rely on the rest of the world showing compassion. If we can’t even rely on people to mind their own business or be nice, how can we place bets on compassion? I won’t let it happen to my child again though. No, I won’t go around telling everyone ahead of time — he’s entitled to his privacy and BB’s now at the point where he wants no one to know. I told him that means he has to be on his best behavior, and he’s trying. We’ve also worked with him on responding properly when someone corrects him and/or touches him. There will not be a repeat occurrence.

I’m not of the belief that children collectively belong to a community, or that their feelings/thoughts are any less important than ours. I get that things happen, and that in groups, he very well may be disciplined again by a, ahem, well-meaning adult, but it had better be someone that knows him and has implied permission..not someone whom he just happens to be sitting near for the first time.

Onwards and upwards, I hope?

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