Autism Watch: 2007

Archive for September 2011

BB woke up this morning in an awesome mood. He woke up before me, in fact, and woke me up. (Not something I view as his best choice of the day, as I was having a really cool dream about traveling…) He was being uber-sweet, turning on my coffee pot, and he even got me a big coffee mug and the creamer. Ahhh, life is good. A relaxing morning, a promising day at work, schoolwork planned and prepped, good coffee and a happy BB.

Then it happened.

Mom, I have a headache.

What level? 6.5.

I give him an ibuprofen and get him settled on his bed with a movie.

Thirty minutes later, it’s 7.5. He decides he wants to forego the next prescription in his migraine arsenal, so I let him be in charge.

Thirty minutes later, it’s still 7.5. Sorry, BB hon, you need to think about the pill.

“Mom, it makes me dopey.”

Yes, son, I realize that, but dopey or pain, out of the two, isn’t dopey better?

He takes the pill. Cut in four tiny pieces.

He snoozles a little, watches more tv, and two hours later, he’s out of the room, bored.

Then what I call a depression cycle rolls in. He sobs, he cries, he’s bored, this day is bad, it’s awful, it stinks, it’s not a good day.

Bud, I’m right there with you. Not only do you feel like crap, but there’s a work issue that’s out of my hands. Sometimes, being a manager means you have to make or take part in decisions that are difficult. Things that have nothing to do with you personally but are part of the job; in management, decisions are made that are in the best interest of the company, and they’re not always pretty. I guess it’s human nature to shoot the messenger, but it can really make you wonder sometimes why people don’t understand that or want to make you out to be the bad guy when you’re not operating in a vacuum. I’d like to be all-powerful, in charge of all the things I can do each day without getting approval, different from now, but then again? Maybe not. Oh well, it’s a job and I’m fortunate. This job allows me to help my family and be home with BB, and he desperately needs it.

So what do I do? I turn off my work machine. I get out the popcorn maker and get BB settled on the couch. Turn on On Demand, rent Rio, and laugh together. Perfect medicine for both of us.

Autism has brought me extremely close to my son. It’s not something I’d ask for — my other kids obviously can’t get the same amount of attention, and it’s not fair and I hate it daily — but you take what you’re given and you move forward with it. I can’t afford to let a bad day at work get me down, and it’s a three-day weekend, time for a lot of prayer, relaxation, hanging with the kids and time with my best friend, my husband.

Migraines, stay away, we’re done with you here for a while. Give the kid a break, okay?

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