Autism Watch: 2007

The Invisible Kids with Autism

Posted on: July 26, 2011

Yesterday, my husband talked to someone who said “Oh, and tell <our daughter> hi from us!”

Last week, someone said “And how’s <our daughter> doing? And xxx and xxx?” (XXX would be our older kids.)

Family isn’t immune — “Can <our daughter> come to the beach with us?”

We answer their sentence, then say “And BB is doing great…” I sometimes add “Thanks for asking!”

Apparently it’s not an acceptable answer — I’m supposed to just ignore the fact that they ignore him. My “Thanks for asking” comment is usually met with silence.

It’s like autism makes my son the invisible boy until we bring him up.

I realize that sometimes people don’t know what to say. You want to be careful not to say the wrong thing, so you opt not to say anything. But if you recognize yourself as doing this — I think we all have situations where we are at a loss for words — at least say “How’s <BB> doing?” You don’t have to specify, you just need to ask how he/she is doing. It means everything to us when our child is seen as just as good as everyone else’s child. Because he is. We all like to think our kids are the cutest, the sweetest, the smartest, the best..problem is, we all think that way, and a smart parent will realize that.

Autism doesn’t mean my son is dumb. In fact, quite the contrary, he’s incredibly gifted and working at an academic level years beyond his age.

Autism doesn’t mean my son is unaware of what’s going on around him. He’s surprisingly adept at listening to conversations while still focusing on writing HTML for a game he’s designing. He can hear a song once, while playing a game, and repeat it note for note, word for word, weeks later, without ever hearing it again.

Autism doesn’t mean my son is unable to do something outside of his scope of interest. Just like any other child, he’s got a lot of abilities but chooses what he wants to do. In fact, he’s probably more in tune with his interests and abilities than people without autism.

Autism doesn’t affect his hearing. He can still hear you when you let your child get away with calling him a name or when you whisper “It’s okay, go do your thing, BB will be fine on his own.” Again.

Autism doesn’t render him incapable of comprehending your speech. He knows what your words mean. He knows what it means when you say “I’m not going to keep coming to visit you if you don’t hug me.”

(Something I want to point out: that won’t make BB or any other child with autism want to hug you.)

Just because you don’t understand a child with autism or you don’t want to understand a child with autism doesn’t give you the right to be mean. Because that’s what it is: being mean. Ignoring a child for behavior he can’t control is like refusing to help push a wheelchair uphill when the person is a paraplegic, and who would do that?

Next time you deal with a family with a child with autism, ask about the child. Even if you have to fake it, ask. And if you have to fake it, maybe it’s time to re-examine why you feel that way — why does it bug you so much to acknowledge that this family is dealing with a child with special needs? Do you have to agree with everything someone does to like them? No, so why is a child with autism-related behaviors any different? Maybe it’s time to stop letting your personal feelings get in the way and just be the friend, the Godmother, the cousin, the aunt, the grandfather. That means loving the child for whomever he is and overlooking the rest, even if you don’t agree with the way the mom and dad parent him. Love him and respect him, just like you would any other child.

It really is that simple.

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1 Response to "The Invisible Kids with Autism"

So true. It seems like a lot of people prefer to ignore that which they don’t understand.

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