Autism Watch: 2007

First Day of School

Posted on: July 25, 2011

It’s 8:19am. I haven’t received a call yet. I know it’s early, but I have hopes that his first day is problem-free. I dropped him off at 7:14, fifteen minutes before he has to be in there, but early enough for breakfast if he wants an extra snack before the day starts. He ate his normal homemade chocolate chip waffle before we left and usually eats the breakfast there at school too (which they deliver to every class for every student) but said he wasn’t hungry today for school breakfast, so I think there were some nerves.

BB likes to wear Mardi Gras beads. Everywhere. A few around his neck, a couple around his wrists, and sometimes, even around his ankles. (Two weeks ago at his ped appointment, another child saw him and laughed out loud. Mom looked, smiled, but said nothing to her boy who was obviously laughing at another child. Nice, eh?) Today he wore them again, minus the ones on his ankles. I hope his teachers leave him be and he’s not teased. He is his own person, and I love that he has his own style and is comfortable with himself; I just wish others were comfortable with his differences and learn to handle their responses better. I see the problem as being with them, not BB, and I wish teachers taught students more frequently to be glad for the variety in people, and to appreciate those unique qualities rather than mock them.

I have high hopes things will go well. He is in the gifted program, and that means a lot of changing classrooms. I took him in last week to see those rooms that were new, so he could transition better, but I also don’t know that the teachers were aware that he even had an IEP and that I was there solely to talk to him about him in detail, not so we could not have to attend Open House. (I hate Open Houses. There, I said it. Every parent wants to talk to the teacher, you all walk around the crowded room in tiny steps and the parents who know each other stand and talk, which means that it’s one more opportunity for us to be ignored as we know no one, and those that we do know don’t really have much of an interest in doing more — small town life is not easy to get involved with if you don’t have active family here or weren’t raised here.) The main reason we went to meet them was for him to have uninterrupted time to get to know his teacher(s) a bit, to scope out his location, to make a seat request if we weren’t happy with the existing one (because of his eyes and because of his space issues, and because some teachers find that isolating him makes their life easier) and to advise them of a few things that would make his and their life easier. So much for that, the ten minutes we got allowed basically no time for that, and didn’t even confirm for us that they’d seen he even has an IEP. For all we know, they aren’t even aware he has autism. The asst. principal used to handle this type of thing, as well as classroom assignment, but he was moved. Not sure if any ball was dropped, but time will tell. Until then, I don’t want to worry.

Yesterday, he decompressed from being gone all day Saturday at the birthday party. He had SO much fun and wasn’t a problem at all, and we’re thrilled. Onwards and upwards, right?

 

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