Autism Watch: 2007

I Took Autism to the Park

Posted on: March 9, 2010

BB’s been on independent study for several weeks now. While I have absolutely no freedom..zip, zilch, nada…as he’s home with me 24/7, he’s happier. His anxiety levels are way down, and his anger issues are much better. But, he is at the point where getting him to leave the house takes some work. He doesn’t want to leave for just anything. He never really has, but it’s worse now. Errands? Heck no, mom, I don’t want to go there. Take my service dog for a walk? Mom, it’ s cold out there, and I’d have to get fully dressed! (I may have to give him that one. It’s been cold and rainy for weeks now.) But, I told him today that we were taking a break from the house — it was sunny and bright, although still chilly. Snow is so shiny in the local mountains/foothills, you can practically see the cold, but it’s gorgeous, so I was bent on a trip to the park.

Fast-forward to 1pm. He gets dressed, and is fine with it. We had a good talk about zombies and their weaponry on the three-minute drive, and then we climb out of the car, walk halfway through the field to the play area and realize it’s flooded. Good one, Mom. Good plan. Where’s the sidewalk???

His face falls as he realizes we’ re not alone. There are other kids playing. Worse yet, other kids playing together. He climbs for two minutes, then runs away and hides in an empty picnic kiosk a bit away. I follow him, only to find out he wanted to be alone. Sigh. I move to the sun to drive off my dripping flip-flops (I know, I know, but it IS still California) and attempt to talk him into swinging with me. No, Mom, there are kids on some of the swings. Yes, honey, but some swings are empty. He marinates that thought for a bit, then jets away. I pick up my dripping poor choice of footwear and follow. We climb on swings, which were blessedly ALL empty by that point. I get on one end…he gets on the other. We swing…for three minutes. He gets up, runs off, I hop off and for a split second can’t see him. Where’d he go?

Oh yes, silly me. What mother doesn’t look under the slide to see if her child is laying behind it, prostrate on the ground? Sigh. “Want to go home, Honey?” Yes, Mom. Autism somehow had snuck along for the ride with my adorable, loving, super-intelligent son who has major social skills issues. And sadness over a serious lack of friends.

We climb in the car. Park trip=not a success. But, he did agree it was nice to get out in the fresh air. Since he’s communicative and willing, we stop at the Rite-Aid for a double-scoop of ice cream..him, not me. (The scale told me yesterday that I need to take a few days away from extracurricular snacking.)  Ice cream makes it home, and he’s a happy child all over again. Autism, you aren’t invited to our next park trip.

Advertisements

1 Response to "I Took Autism to the Park"

That is hard, but I am glad to hear that homeschool is working well for BB. D used to want to play with other kids, but after so much failure with initiating play adn rejection as a result, he now hides behind my legs when other children are in the vicinity. We have to keep pushing them…firmly, but within reason.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 33 other followers

Twitter Updates


  • Emily: Thank you so much. I share your pain and am glad to know I'm not alone in my struggles with my very verbal autistic spectrum son.
  • Meet Julia, an Autistic Girl in a Sesame Street world | American Badass Activists: […] Apocalypse. That, or demonized in news and online rants, especially after a campus mass murder or a plane-halting meltdown . . . . So this b
  • Alecia: I'm an autistic young woman in the 7th grade. I have experienced exceedingly stupefied and unnecessary discrimination since elementary school. It is s
%d bloggers like this: