Autism Watch: 2007

Our Responsibility is to Our Kids, and No One Else

Posted on: October 1, 2009

I haven’t blogged recently — busy (like everyone else), migraines, dd having seizures, sick kids, and in general, just not sure what to say. I don’t want a blog full of only rants about how bad my neighborhood is, how mean people are, and how tired I am of being afraid to answer my doorbell. Until I had something non-rant like, I decided silence was golden.

But — you knew there was a but coming — I wanted to come out of hiding to add my opinions to the topic-at-large right now. You know the one, the one where we as a community in general are pretending we actually have a right to know, or a right to know better, than what another family should have done or has gone through. You know, that kind of judgment that we absolutely hate to have pronounced on us.

I love the friends I’ve made in the autism community. I’ve learned more from these fellow trenchmates than anywhere else, yet I still feel, and have mentioned before, that sometimes we’re the least tolerant of each other, yet we expect, or demand, that tolerance from anyone outside of the autism community. This seems like an extreme of that, and it’s pretty sad, for lack of fancier adjectives. Sad.

Without repeating everything others have said, my thoughts are this: the Travoltas are humans. They are parents who love their children, except they have money and celebrity. Why does that money or celebrity make them responsible for sharing their personal trials or tribulations? So they didn’t tell the world their child had autism. If that was me, you’d not blink an eye. But throw in money and celebrity, and I should share? Where’s my privacy? Where are  my rights? My child’s rights?

Leave the Travoltas alone. Their child died. He is gone. They are suffering the biggest loss a parent can suffer. Leave them be. They didn’t owe us any facts. No celebrity does — if they do, it’s a bonus and we should be thankful instead of expecting it. In fact, now, I’d expect less celebrities to come forward. Who wants the scrutiny, the judgment, the “you should do xxx and not do xxx” that the Travoltas are seeing now? How dare people hassle them for their choice of medication, or no medication? People, we weren’t there. We aren’t there. They owe us NOTHING. Back the flock off.

There, I said it. And on the other side, I do wonder why autism is seen as something, by Scientology, that cannot be recognized, but I’m not a Scientologist (thank God) nor will I ever be, so I can’t speak further to that. If they find it shameful or fictitious or unmentionable because it may require psychotropic drugs…well, I’ll just leave my thoughts to your imagination in that regard, though I will say, doesn’t God love us all?

On that note, I hope something else happens soon to distract from this situation. There are so many more urgent things to discuss, like my son’s new social skills program, YAY! I say we all talk about that, until something more exciting comes along. Sound good?

Advertisements

2 Responses to "Our Responsibility is to Our Kids, and No One Else"

I could not agree more!

To meet people on the internet like you, is the reason that I am blogging.

with love, from Holland,
a proud mom of a son with autism

Indi

I totally agree with you, I have been avoiding my blog as well, for multiple reasons….I could not have said it better myself…

Peace and love
from a proud auttie mom
Kimberly

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 33 other followers

Twitter Updates

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.


  • Emily: Thank you so much. I share your pain and am glad to know I'm not alone in my struggles with my very verbal autistic spectrum son.
  • Meet Julia, an Autistic Girl in a Sesame Street world | American Badass Activists: […] Apocalypse. That, or demonized in news and online rants, especially after a campus mass murder or a plane-halting meltdown . . . . So this b
  • Alecia: I'm an autistic young woman in the 7th grade. I have experienced exceedingly stupefied and unnecessary discrimination since elementary school. It is s
%d bloggers like this: