Autism Watch: 2007

Archive for September 2009

I guess there’s no other way to put it politely. I’ve been avoiding the blog. I deal with autism all day every day, in some aspect or another, and lately, when I have a spare minute, the last thing I feel like doing is blogging about it. More autism? No thanks, I’ll pass.

But, I think I’m over it. Or at least for now?

The last few weeks…I don’t want to re-live them, but they’ve taken away a lot of faith that people really do love thy neighbor. Maybe I was naive that they ever really did, but I guess I’d been lucky. I’d had good neighbors and aside from the occasional nosey stranger, going out in public was getting easier. But now? I don’t let my son out in the front yard without constant supervision. Out in public, like at the county fair just last Monday, we had to stay on him like glue, after a couple of random unknowns spoke out of turn. (Who knew an empty marshmallow shooter was dangerous to sleeping iguanas?)

But, onwards and upwards. We’ve packed our garage and our china is boxed. House plans are chosen, and tentative house sale dates chosen. It’s not only a reality now, but it’s an agenda that is going to be daily for quite some time now. On a good note, BB is ready for it. He’s ready for a fresh start, new neighbors that won’t talk crap about him because they have nothing better to do. He won’t be blamed for their inability to control their own children. We’ve learned a lot from this experience, and we’re thankful that we can walk away from the garbage. The small-minded ignorant people can’t leave that behind, no matter where they go. We’ll soon have different family to celebrate holidays with, and while we’re going to miss our close friends, BB is going to have 5+ acres to run around on. Animals to chase. Bugs to corral. Gardening to help me with. Healthier food, because we’re going to fish from our pond and eat our homegrown veggies and fruit. Mom and Dad will have less errands, so the stress will decrease and the overall pace will be more enjoyable.

In the meantime, school is doing well. He visits the nurse’s office often — ‘burning fingers,’ ‘sore legs,’ or ‘too hot.’ But the staff sees him for what he is: a sweet little guy who likes to talk and is entertaining but just needs to vent and get things out of his system. Like us, they’ve learned it’s better to give him ten minutes of time or he’ll whine and be unhappy for 30. Ten minutes of attention, even five in a pinch, make all the difference. He starts a new social skills program in a couple of weeks, at school (once a week) and we’re also working on using Rick Lavoie’s recommended approach towards dealing with his behavioral and discipline issues. It was recommended at his weekly therapy and we really like it. The DVD is called “When the Chips are Down.” It’s old (think late-80s-ish?) but the process is timeless.

So, there you have it. More personal viewpoints on daily life with autism and less of the general perspective. We’ll see what tomorrow brings!


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